Posted in Throwback Thursdays

Throwback Thursday: Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz #travelingsistersread

Throwback Thursday is a meme created by Renee, Its Book Talk to share some of our old favorites as well as books that we’ve finally got around to reading that were published over a year ago.

Today we would like to share another favorite Traveling Sisters Group read that made for a great discussion where we shared many suspicions and theories.

Magpie MurdersGoodreads Summary

Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. After working with the bestselling crime writer for years, she’s intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus Pünd, who solves mysteries disturbing sleepy English villages. An homage to queens of classic British crime such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, Alan’s traditional formula has proved hugely successful. So successful that Susan must continue to put up with his troubling behavior if she wants to keep her job.

Conway’s latest tale has Atticus Pünd investigating a murder at Pye Hall, a local manor house. Yes, there are dead bodies and a host of intriguing suspects, but the more Susan reads, the more she’s convinced that there is another story hidden in the pages of the manuscript: one of real-life jealousy, greed, ruthless ambition, and murder.

Traveling Sisters Group review

Norma, Lindsay and I read Magpie Murders with seven of our Traveling Sisters and it brought out one of the best and most fun group discussions we have had yet. For this one, we tried to stay as close as we could to each other with our reading goals so we could play detectives together and discuss our suspicions along the way. For some of us, it was really hard to put this one down but it sure was worth it staying somewhat close together for the discussions.

Magpie Murders is a brilliant, hugely enjoyable, fun, and delightful well-plotted intriguing Golden Age style mystery inside a mystery that is done exceptionally well. A fantastic playful whodunit with satisfying twists and turns and many red herrings for us to ponder and discuss with our Traveling Sisters.

Anthony Horowitz does such a fantastic job here with all the characters and they are so well developed. Some quirky, some cunning, some likable, and some not so much and some we grew to like. All very interesting and compelling to read.

We all loved the setting and the atmosphere of the small, quaint English Village where everyone knows everyone and everyone has a secret.

We really enjoyed sharing clues, our suspicions, red herrings and keeping track of the suspects. Two sisters really doing a great job keeping us on track with the suspects. We all tried to pay close attention to one another to pick up on those clues and information to piece this mystery together. One sister picking up a clue not knowing for what and we all were very surprised at how that fitted into the mystery. We were discussing the clues without even realizing they were clues. We suspected everyone and no one with all the red herrings in this one. This made for such a fun and delightful reading experience.

The ending like every good whodunit which was wrapped up nicely with no loose ends and we all were satisfied with it in the end. However, one character did have us discussing how we felt about how the story wrapped up for her and we were split on how we felt about that and it brought out a bit of a discussion for us.

This is such a good choice for a group read or works really well if you so choose to read it on your own. We suggest grabbing your favorite beverage and curling up in your comfy chair and getting lost in this brilliant absorbing golden age mystery within a mystery for a few hours. It will be a favorite for some us and a favorite sister read for Brenda and Norma. We all highly recommend.

The Traveling Friends Group are now reading The Word is Murder and really enjoying it and the discussion.

The Word Is MurderGoodreads summary

The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz

SHE PLANNED HER OWN FUNERAL. BUT DID SHE ARRANGE HER OWN MURDER?

New York Times bestselling author of Magpie Murders and Moriarty, Anthony Horowitz has yet again brilliantly reinvented the classic crime novel, this time writing a fictional version of himself as the Watson to a modern-day Holmes.

One bright spring morning in London, Diana Cowper – the wealthy mother of a famous actor – enters a funeral parlor. She is there to plan her own service.

Six hours later she is found dead, strangled with a curtain cord in her own home.

Enter disgraced police detective Daniel Hawthorne, a brilliant, eccentric investigator who’s as quick with an insult as he is to crack a case. Hawthorne needs a ghost writer to document his life; a Watson to his Holmes. He chooses Anthony Horowitz.

Drawn in against his will, Horowitz soon finds himself a the center of a story he cannot control. Hawthorne is brusque, temperamental and annoying but even so his latest case with its many twists and turns proves irresistible. The writer and the detective form an unusual partnership. At the same time, it soon becomes clear that Hawthorne is hiding some dark secrets of his own.

A masterful and tricky mystery that springs many surprises, The Word is Murder is Anthony Horowitz at his very best.

Have you read these titles?  Want to read them?  Drop us a comment!  We would love to hear from you!

6 thoughts on “Throwback Thursday: Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz #travelingsistersread

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