Posted in Reviews, Traveling Sisters Read Reviews

Sold on A Monday by Kristina McMorris #travelingsistersread #BookReview

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Norma’s review

First things first……This is one of those books where I just had to read it because of that totally captivating cover and title of this book, which I found both to be absolutely intriguing!

SOLD ON A MONDAY by KRISTINA MCMORRIS was definitely an interesting, heartbreaking but yet heartwarming, and haunting tale but it left me with some mixed feelings upon finishing though. I thought this book was a good, quiet, easy and quick read that definitely had some great aspects to it but it didn’t really have enough emotional depth to it to make me feel emotionally engaged in this whole story.

I thought that this story had so much potential but unfortunately this book went a little differently than I expected. This was more of a story about Ellis, the reporter who takes a picture of two boys with a sign that reads “2 children for sale” and Lillian a secretary that works at the same newspaper as him. I would have liked the story to have given me a little more insight into the actual photos rather than the consequences surrounding the story behind that picture.

KRISTINA MCMORRIS does deliver a descriptive read here when it came to the life and times of a reporter and I could really envision some of the scenes that transpired in this book. The characters were well-developed and likeable but somewhat predictable. The ending was sweet & satisfying for me.

Knowing that the theme of this book was inspired by an actual newspaper photograph taken in 1948 of a mother and her four children with a sign that says “4 CHILDREN FOR SALE INQUIRE WITHIN” was absolutely heartbreaking and definitely pulled at my heartstrings. I just wish that the emotional pull that I felt while reading the “Author’s Note” would have happened for me while I was reading this book.

Brenda’s Traveling Sisters review

Norma, Lindsay and I read Sold on a Monday with five of our Traveling Sisters and we all had similar thoughts on this story.

We were immediately drawn into the story with the photo of the “2 Children For Sale” We were intrigued by the photo and the story it held. The children in the photo pulled at our heartstrings and we wanted to know more about them.  However, that was not the story told here. The story takes a different turn and becomes about two other children and our main character quest to find them.

What started off as a gut-wrenching story started to lose that emotional pull we really needed and the story started to become a bit predictable for us resulting in how we felt about this story.

In the end, we were left disappointed and wanting more and exhausted from all the drama in this story when we really wanted to be exhausted from our emotions instead.

I think that had we known the story was inspired by the photo and not about the children in the photo we might have enjoyed the story more.  This is probably one we shouldn’t of went in blind with. Even though we had our issues with this one we still highly recommend this story for readers looking for a lighter story with some drama.

Lindsay’s review

Oh, that cover!!!

Perhaps due to my intense attraction to that heart-wrenching cover along with the book blurb, my expectations may have been set a little too high. With that stated, it was still an enjoyable story, just much lighter and different than expected. It simply didn’t ‘pack the punch’ (thank you, Marialyce) that I was hoping for.

This novel follows Ellis Reed, a rookie employee in the newsroom who is trying to make a name for himself as a reporter. He is on a small assignment in a little town when his car breaks down and he finds himself taking a random photo of two young boys sitting on a rundown porch holding a sign “2 Children For Sale”. Though a completely random decision to take the photo, it is a life changing choice that leads to a long trail of consequences for Ellis.

The idea for this book came from an actual photo taken in 1948 showing four children sitting on their front porch steps with a sign saying “4 Children For Sale – Inquire Within”, their mother hiding her face in the background. My hope was that this would be their story. I wanted to know what would bring a mother to the point of selling her children. What happened to these poor, innocent children? The novel took a completely different path than I had anticipated which unfortunately felt like a letdown. I was craving the knowledge that could possibly explain this haunting photo. The story that did unravel through these pages was interesting, yet lacked the intensity and emotion I had hoped for. The first half of the book held my interest much more than the second half where I found that it became overly dramatic with a few too many things going on.

Overall, this was an enjoyable story that had a lighter tone than I had expected.

From our Traveling Sisters reviews.

From Angela review.  Angela joined the Traveling Sisters over the summer and this was her second sister read with us.

I can’t stop thinking about the photographs – the cover of this book and the one that Ellis stages to support his piece for the newspaper he works for after his first photo is inadvertently destroyed, and the one in the author’s note that inspired her to write this book. I always love knowing the author’s inspiration for a story. But the one that haunts me the most is the first photo that Ellis takes, the one that is lost, the one that I only see in my imagination. The description of two little boys sitting on a porch with a sign next to them – “2 children for sale”. When I read about this first photograph and Ellis’s reaction “A breath caught in his throat”, it did in mine as well and was a truly visceral reaction for me. It’s a year after the stock market crash and a time when things are hard for people, but I shuddered to think – selling your children! I thought the story would be about these two little boys, their family, the impact of the Depression, but it turned out to be about two other children, and mostly about a man trying to make amends for a mistake he makes

From Diane’s review.  Diane joined our group shortly after we started the group. Diane often joins in on sisters reads and you can see many of her reviews on Goodreads.

A picture speaks a thousand words, and it is a picture that will start Ellis on a journey of self discovery and moral questioning. Set against the Great Depression, this novel brings home the many things people had to do to survive. It is the children and a new picture that will bring Ellis his first success as a journalist, and that will bring Lily and Ellis together in a far reaching quest.

It is the realistic atmosphere created, of a busy newsroom, of single mom trying to earn a living during a time when unmarried women were not easily accepted, and of course the desperation of the times, that was my favorite part of this novel. Lily and Ellis are flawed characters, as these are usually the most interesting, and though I liked them, I wasn’t really drawn into their stories. Just didn’t feel the emotional connection that I usually feel with this authors books.

Have you read this one? Do you agree or disagree with the Traveling Sisters in this sister read?  Do you now what to read it?  Drop us comment!  We would love to hear from you.

 

 

8 thoughts on “Sold on A Monday by Kristina McMorris #travelingsistersread #BookReview

  1. Wonderful and thoughtful reviews ladies. I am reading it right now and I agree with you that it was the cover that pulled me in. I also like reading historical fiction that takes place in North America to find out what our ancestors lived through. I will post my review in a couple of days.

    Liked by 1 person

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